why 8 bits in a byte?

why 8 bits in a byte?
This grouping of bits (8 per byte) comes from the EBCDIC collating sequence which has existed since the 1960's. The ASCII collating sequence only requires 7 significant bits. Some earlier machine architecture used BCD (6 bits) and the IBM 1620 used bi-quinary (5 bits).
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Is a byte always 8 bits?
3 Answers. Yes, a byte is always 8 bits in modern computing. In the book, the word and the size of the word is explicitly mentioned, while there is not a word (haha) about bytes. ... The whole size is expressed in (16 bit ) words rather than bytes. Dec 27, 2018
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What is 8bit byte?
A similar question is, "Why are there 12 eggs in a dozen?" The 8 - bit byte is something that people settled on through trial and error over the past 50 years. With 8 bits in a byte, you can represent 256 values ranging from 0 to 255, as shown here: 0 = 00000000 1 = 00000001 2 = 00000010 ... 254 = 11111110 255 = 11111111.
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Why do bytes only have 8 bits?
The byte was originally the smallest number of bits that could hold a single character (I assume standard ASCII). We still use ASCII standard, so 8 bits per character is still relevant. This sentence, for instance, is 41 bytes. That's easily countable and practical for our purposes. Mar 17, 2017
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Why do we use bytes instead of bits?
A bit is the smallest unit of computer information. It's essentially a single binary data point; either yes or no, on or off, up or down. A byte on the other hand is a unit of memory that usually contains 8 bits. This is because historically, 8 bits are needed to encode a single character of text. Jul 21, 2017
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